Manchin announces $468k to combat food insecurity in West Virginia


WASHINGTON, D.C. — U.S. Senator Joe Manchin (D-WV), member of the Senate Appropriations Committee, announced $468,829 from the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Food and Nutrition Service (FNS) to the West Virginia Department of Agriculture. The Emergency Food Assistance Program (TEFAP) funding was made possible through the American Rescue Plan to provide emergency food assistance and bolster local food distribution infrastructure in rural and underserved communities across the country. The West Virginia Department of Agriculture will distribute the majority of the funding to the Facing Hunger Food Bank in Huntington and the Mountaineer Food Bank in Gassaway.

“Every West Virginian should have access to quality, affordable food and a roof over their head each night. Addressing food insecurity continues to be one of my top priorities, and I am pleased USDA is investing in the West Virginia Department of Agriculture to support our local food organizations like the Facing Hunger Food Bank and the Mountaineer Food Bank to provide emergency food assistance for West Virginians in need,” said Senator Manchin. “I look forward to seeing the positive impacts of this funding and as a member of the Senate Appropriations Committee, I will continue to advocate for resources to combat food insecurity and feed West Virginians in need.”

States receiving TEFAP Reach and Resiliency Grants will use the funds to implement unique and creative solutions to address potential gaps in TEFAP coverage, and to make critical investments in food distribution infrastructure in underserved areas. Through the grants, USDA is empowering State agencies to better serve those in need of emergency food assistance, especially in communities facing barriers to access. TEFAP helps supplement the diets of low-income Americans by providing them with emergency food assistance at no cost. Through TEFAP, USDA purchases a variety of nutritious, high-quality USDA Foods, and makes those foods available to State agencies. States provide the food to local agencies that they have selected, usually food banks, which in turn distribute the food to local organizations, such as soup kitchens and food pantries that directly serve the public. These local organizations then distribute the USDA Foods to eligible recipients for household consumption or use them to prepare and serve meals in congregate settings.

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