Lessons learned while serving on the Upshur Co. Board of Education

© 2018-The Record Delta

A lesson learned while serving on the Upshur County Board of Education has to do with saluting our teacher and service personnel who are recognized for outstanding service month by month at our public meetings. Uniformly, as Superintendent Roy Wager highlights, the reasons they are being honored I identify as the characteristics of emotional intelligence. For example, in January 2018 we applauded Tammy Kelley, cafeteria manager at Buckhannon-Upshur Middle School, and Cheryl Cain, English teacher at Buckhannon-Upshur High School. Both connect emotionally with students and other school professionals.

Emotional Intelligence is the capability of individuals to recognize their own emotions and those of others, to discern between different feelings and label them. Now when the Upshur County Board of Education had an opportunity to select a replacement member due to the resignation of Carl “Robbie” Martin as he makes a run for the House of Delegates, I wanted to base my vote for a replacement selection on E.I.

My, my!

How very pleased I was when all ten candidates who volunteered for appointment appeared to have high Emotional Intelligence. How wonderful it is that 10 strong applicants sensed what Upshur County Schools needs at this time and were willing to toss their hats in the ring.

I will not divulge the executive session discussion of our current BOE as we wrestled with selecting a board member to serve until the May 8, 2018, Primary Election, at which point our Upshur County voters will choose a new member for our five-member board.

But I want to dissect and analyze a lesson learned serving nearly eight years as a member of the BOE. Emotional intelligence appears crucial for thinking through the issues around education of our children and grandchildren. Just consider the needs for empathy for what our students are going through with the opioid crisis, nothing short of one of the worst if not THE worst public health issue in our state’s history. Through the eyes of our students—for the sake of our children and grandchildren—E. I. is necessary for clear judgment and good decisions.

Or consider the importance of emotional intelligence in dealing with the hiring of a new Superintendent of Upshur County Schools. How blessed we are in Upshur County that Roy Wager dedicated more than forty years of teaching and administrating experience to the position that he so ably holds now. Understandably he is wanting to enjoy the fruits of his labors and share precious time with his family. So our BOE begins the process of selecting the next leader for what certainly is one of the most important professional positions in our county. Just consider the consequences of bad decisions based on bad thinking: we risk collapse of a vital institution. Though we are in a situation of high stakes, our newly appointed board member will add wisdom to our selection process going forward into the spring as we search for our next Superintendent.

We welcome Kristi Lawrence Wilkerson to our dedicated and hard-working Upshur County Board of Education. Now we all roll up our sleeves and keep working hard for the sake of our students.

Uniformly, as Superintendent Roy Wager highlights, the reasons they are being honored I identify as the characteristics of emotional intelligence. For example, in January 2018 we applauded Tammy Kelley, cafeteria manager at Buckhannon-Upshur Middle School, and Cheryl Cain, English teacher at Buckhannon-Upshur High School. Both connect emotionally with students and other school professionals.

Emotional Intelligence is the capability of individuals to recognize their own emotions and those of others, to discern between different feelings and label them. Now when the Upshur County Board of Education had an opportunity to select a replacement member due to the resignation of Carl “Robbie” Martin as he makes a run for the House of Delegates, I wanted to base my vote for a replacement selection on E.I.

My, my!

How very pleased I was when all ten candidates who volunteered for appointment appeared to have high Emotional Intelligence. How wonderful it is that 10 strong applicants sensed what Upshur County Schools needs at this time and were willing to toss their hats in the ring.

I will not divulge the executive session discussion of our current BOE as we wrestled with selecting a board member to serve until the May 8, 2018, Primary Election, at which point our Upshur County voters will choose a new member for our five-member board.

But I want to dissect and analyze a lesson learned serving nearly eight years as a member of the BOE. Emotional intelligence appears crucial for thinking through the issues around education of our children and grandchildren. Just consider the needs for empathy for what our students are going through with the opioid crisis, nothing short of one of the worst if not THE worst public health issue in our state’s history. Through the eyes of our students—for the sake of our children and grandchildren—E. I. is necessary for clear judgment and good decisions.

Or consider the importance of emotional intelligence in dealing with the hiring of a new Superintendent of Upshur County Schools. How blessed we are in Upshur County that Roy Wager dedicated more than forty years of teaching and administrating experience to the position that he so ably holds now. Understandably he is wanting to enjoy the fruits of his labors and share precious time with his family. So our BOE begins the process of selecting the next leader for what certainly is one of the most important professional positions in our county. Just consider the consequences of bad decisions based on bad thinking: we risk collapse of a vital institution. Though we are in a situation of high stakes, our newly appointed board member will add wisdom to our selection process going forward into the spring as we search for our next Superintendent.

We welcome Kristi Lawrence Wilkerson to our dedicated and hard-working Upshur County Board of Education. Now we all roll up our sleeves and keep working hard for the sake of our students.

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